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EDlection2018: Republican Hawley Defeats Democrat McCaskill for Missouri Senate Seat as Dems’ Margin in Chamber Shrinks

By Carolyn Phenicie | November 7, 2018

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EDlection2018: This is one of several dozen races we’ve analyzed for the 2018 midterms that could go on to influence state or federal education policy. Get the latest headlines delivered straight to your inbox; sign up for The 74 Newsletter.

Republican Josh Hawley unseated two-term Democratic Sen. Claire McCaskill in Missouri, according to NBC News.

The race, which had been tight since the beginning, is one of several that Democrats had to retain control of to have any chance of retaking control of the U.S Senate. As of 12:15 a.m. Eastern, Hawley had 53 percent of the votes, with 91 percent reporting. Republicans will retain control of the chamber, though the specific party balance will depend on the outcome of races in Nevada and Arizona that have yet to be called.

(Keep up with our liveblog here for more updates on what’s happening in Senate and other races across the country.)

“This state drives me crazy, but I love every corner of it,” McCaskill said in her concession speech.

The two had battled over health care, the confirmation of Justice Brett Kavanaugh and alignment with the policies of President Donald Trump, who won the state by 20 points in 2016.

Hawley is currently the attorney general of Missouri. Long an advocate for what he deems “religious liberty,” he recused himself from work on the Trinity Lutheran case before the Supreme Court last year. He had done legal work on the church’s behalf in its challenge to a ban on its participation in a state preschool resurfacing program.

McCaskill had long focused on issues around sexual assault, first in the military and then on college campuses. She ran a nationwide survey in 2014 on how campuses handle allegations of assault and more recently expressed concerns over the Trump Administration’s proposed changes to federal rules governing how schools handle the issue.

EDlection2018: This is one of several dozen races we’ve analyzed for the 2018 midterms that could go on to influence state or federal education policy. Get the latest headlines delivered straight to your inbox; sign up for The 74 Newsletter.

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