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You’re Knot Alone: One Ohio School’s Colorful Campaign to Prevent Suicide

February 11, 2016

Talking Points

You’re Knot Alone: One Ohio school’s creative and colorful campaign to prevent student suicides

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This article is one in a series at The Seventy Four which profiles the heroes, victories, success stories and random acts of kindness to be found at schools all across America. Read more of our recent inspiring coverage at The74million.org/series/inspiring.

Students at one Ohio high school are all wearing the same thing and they don’t even mind. That’s because the purple bracelets adorning so many wrists are for a good cause: suicide prevention.

“You’re Knot Alone” is the brainchild of Grace Blandin and Maddy Eye, members of the Lake High School Students in Action club, a group dedicated to serving their local community in Millbury with fundraisers and volunteering. They’ve distributed the bracelets, which wrap twice around the wrist with a knot tied in the middle, to fellow teens in their school.

"I have lost several family members over the past few years to suicide, so I really just wanted to make a difference, and help stop it,” Blandin told 13 ABC.

Purple was chosen for the color of the bracelets because it is the color of suicide prevention. They’re handed out with a card featuring suicide prevention information.



The “You’re Knot Alone” project has cracked the top 15 at the Jefferson Awards Foundation LEAD360 Awards, out of a whopping 5,000 entries. They’re hoping to make it to the top 3 and expand their effort on a national level.

In the meantime, their current goal is to get 8,000 teens in their local area to wear the bracelets.

According to the CDC, suicide is the second leading cause of death among people aged 15-34. In 2013, 17% of students in grades 9-12 seriously considered attempting suicide. Students at Lake are hoping the bracelets will help bring those numbers down. “If you see someone with this bracelet on, you can go and talk to them,” senior Austin Wilhelm told the station.


 

You're knot alone is the message and suicide prevention is the mission. How you can help these Lake High School. students at 5:30. Lake High School (Millbury, Ohio) Jefferson Awards Foundation

Posted by Kristian Brown on Monday, February 8, 2016

If you or someone you know are struggling with suicidal thoughts, please call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255.